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Personal Chef Recipe STRIPS OF VEGETABLE.]
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BARLEY SOUP.
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in the gardens of Paris, has beautifully frizzled leaves.
STRIPS OF VEGETABLE.]
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COMMONLY CALLED COCK-A-LEEKIE.
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Personal Chef Recipes - by Mrs Beeton

STRIPS OF VEGETABLE.]

Ingredients:1/2 pint of carrots
1/2 pint of turnips
1/4 pint of onions
2 or 3 leeks
1/2 head of celery
1 lettuce
a little sorrel and chervil
if liked
2 oz. of butter
2 quarts of stock No. 105.
Method:Cut the vegetables into strips of about 1-1/4 inch long, and be particular they are all the same size, or some will be hard whilst the others will be done to a pulp. Cut the lettuce, sorrel, and chervil into larger pieces; fry the carrots in the butter, and pour the stock boiling to them. When this is done, add all the other vegetables, and herbs, and stew gently for at least an hour. Skim off all the fat, pour the soup over thin slices of bread, cut round about the size of a shilling, and serve.
Time: 1-1/2 hour.
Notes: In summer, green peas, asparagus-tops, French beans, &c. can be added. When the vegetables are very strong, instead of frying them in butter at first, they should be blanched, and afterwards simmered in the stock. SORREL.--This is one of the _spinaceous_ plants, which take their name from spinach, which is the chief among them. It is little used in English cookery, but a great deal in French, in which it is employed for soups, sauces, and salads. In English meadows it is usually left to grow wild; but in France, where it is cultivated, its flavour is greatly improved. 132.
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Source: The Book of Household Management Mrs. Isabella Mary Beeton
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